Creating the ocean

Cities are capable of doing extraordinary things.

For instance, they’re capable of gathering thousands of inspired people together to generate change. If our climate strike in Toronto didn’t show that change starts with people, that we are not alone, and that we can create enormous impact together (like marching 10,000 people to make some noise), then you aren’t seeing the ocean right before your eyes. 

It’s our turn to keep the tide turning by making it our own priority to live cleaner, better lives. 

Tea leaves and sustainability

Watching tea leaves uncurl in hot water isn’t particularly interesting. The progress takes on its own pace, and there’s no real outcome in waiting.

Likewise, waiting for culture to change takes a long time. The one thing that speeds up the process are trends, and trends come in waves which speeds up the uncurling, expanding, and brewing process. And, they don’t last for a long time.

We need lots of tea and hot water to help the culture of environmental sustainability uncurl and become stained into our lifestyles.

Join the party!

Big corporate, government, macro action is nothing without personal, local, human demand. However, by the time large organizations start taking action, it might already be too late.

Why wait for larger, slower players to start making their moves in 2030 when you can make your contribution within your next 24 hours?

The advantage we have as singular units of people is that we’re faster and more forgivable. If we make a mistake, it’s way easier for us to right our wrongs as opposed to relying on several tiers of organized hierarchy to make amends.

With that said, we have exciting news: Double Cow and Toronto Zero Waste blog, Find Your Alternative, is pairing up to clean our parks. Starting July 25th with Trinity Bellwoods.

Starting at 6:30PM, we’re going hands-in to collect litter. Join us to make your contribution to the community. See you there!

Part 2: passive house design

Continuing from Part 1: Foundations of a Healthy Building, Joel Anderson talks about Passive House Design—a building standard that originated from Saskatchewan, and is now being debated as one of many environmental solutions for energy-efficient housing. Also, the pros and cons of Net Zero buildings.  

Give it a listen below. Better yet, share it with others who might be interested as well.

If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1 from yesterday, head over to The Farm where all the upcoming interviews on sustainability will be.

See you tomorrow for Part 3: Our Current Sustainable Landscape!

Here’s why the smaller things matter

Bringing your own coffee cup, refusing a disposable bag, and opting for reusable cutlery (just to name a few things we could actively do) could reduce our personal landfill rates by 40%, 60%, 70%, or even 100% if you’re fully committed.

Nothing that you aren’t able to do right now if you wanted to.

And way faster than any large organization or country can spell out “global ocean plastics crisis”.

Even if some of us can be 30% committed to being more environmentally responsible, that’s more action than if we were to remain complacent.