Trying your best!

Trying your best to go zero waste but forgot your reusable bags at home when you took a trip to the supermarket?

Did the barista at your local cafe stick a plastic straw into your drink even though you brought your reusable cup?

It’s okay, we’ve all been there. Making these mistakes every once in a while is forgivable. If you believe it’s worth it, keep trying.

The high-intensity-nonstop-burn-and-drop diet

Burnout is unsustainable. Imagine being sucked out of your energy day-in-day-out, with nothing to help feed into your wellbeing. No music, no exercise, no free socialization.

Another version that might not be as abstract is this:

Imagine going week to week eating nothing but highly refined, sugary foods. This is a diet that feeds our bodies nothing of nutritive value.

It’s not pretty nor good for us, but burnout happens when we repeatedly do things with no progressive outcome.

Spare your wellbeing from it, and instead create meaning into your actions.

Massive incremental change

Our current mandate in sustainability is about change—massive, incremental change. It’s not something we can accomplish by sitting behind a computer screen. Rather, it’s something that happens step by step in the physical world.

We can try to change the world behind our screens, but the digital world is so full of loud and flashy noise, it’ll take us ages to swim through the clutter.

What are you doing to create incremental change in your life?

To find better

Why is it that were bought into thinking that we can’t take action to protect our environment, our health and wellbeing?

Maybe our urban cities have been so far removed from a non-wasteful lifestyle that it seems almost impossible to step away from a fast paced culture. That is, we’re speeding on the highway and there’s no sense in hitting the brakes when there’s nobody up ahead.

There’s no help in following everyone else when it doesn’t make sense for you.

On the other hand, there are just over a million things that can help us be more conscious of taking better care of ourselves, our health, and our futures. It just takes a deeper look to find, but there is the alternative.

The alternative is out there, and it’s better, more sustainable, and necessary for all of us.

Trinity park cleanup

What can a small community do to take action when climate change and government policy is slow to progress?

We can choose to do things that don’t require permission, and something that we can realistically achieve in our own incremental steps.

With that said, Magali Lafleur (blogger from Find Your Alternative) is partnering up with Double Cow to host our own community clean-up at Trinity Bellwoods Park.

It starts with a pickup, and you can tell us you’ll come by responding to our event page here.

Thursday, July 25th at 6:30PM.

Litter is everybody’s problem and this is our chance to make our contribution. See you there.

Design thinkers and current clout

“Design thinking is fluffy” coming from two guys discussing business in a high end co-working office.

I must admit that it generates a lot of excitement and buzz when we use the term design thinking. When asked for it, many who have included it onto their résumé might not explicitly know what design thinking covers.

To clarify, design thinking is a process that is similar to the scientific method. Here’s a broad their of its progressive steps:

  1. Empathize
  2. Define
  3. Ideate
  4. Prototype
  5. Test
  6. Iterate/Implement

Academics in the science community who follow the scientific method don’t qualify themselves as scientific thinkers. It is rather a given that they follow the scientific method as part of their protocol. On the other hand, Design thinking becomes fluffy if the people using the term don’t have an understanding of what it is, and why we have it.

Design thinking is a great thing, and I love everything about the process if it means getting to understand and solve different human problems that contribute to our culture and humanity.

Recycling is out

Our global recycling crisis is getting out of hand. Unfortunately, nobody wants to accept our recyclables, and it’s proving itself to be increasingly and ironically unsustainable from nation to nation.

In action, recycling is confusing and people don’t get clear information as to which material belongs to which bin.

Luckily we have alternatives, which is to reduce and reuse. Not as fashionable, not as convenient, but it works!

Reducing and reusing requires:

  1. More love to take care of our personal belongings
  2. More consciousness of our own lifestyles

Recycling is a system that makes people feel less guilty when we over-consume. It’s a system that needs drastic improvement, or a complete makeover, but we can’t waste our time and wait for it to happen—we’re too impatient for that.

We start with a question

Sustainability is such a general term that it can be paralyzing when it comes to tackling its issues. Here are some questions we want answers to:

  • What might be the reason why there is such large controversy in proving/disproving climate change?
  • Families have been using the recycling bin and bringing it out to the curb since the 1980’s. If the program has existed for so long, why is there so much confusion and contamination in recycling now?
  • Exactly how dependent is the average Canadian on oil?
  • On a human level, what would it take for us to get the ball rolling to correct the current global climate problem?
  • If the world produces more food than people can consume, where does it all go, and why can’t we simply produce less of one third of it goes to waste?
  • If people already know the environment is important, what holds most of us back from acting on what we preach?

The goal of Double Cow is to open up dialogue and awareness to the everyday person about sustainability, and that starts with asking both big and small questions.

If you have questions, articles, references, or people you want featured and shared, leave a comment or email hellodoublecow@gmail.com and let us know!

Join the party!

Big corporate, government, macro action is nothing without personal, local, human demand. However, by the time large organizations start taking action, it might already be too late.

Why wait for larger, slower players to start making their moves in 2030 when you can make your contribution within your next 24 hours?

The advantage we have as singular units of people is that we’re faster and more forgivable. If we make a mistake, it’s way easier for us to right our wrongs as opposed to relying on several tiers of organized hierarchy to make amends.

With that said, we have exciting news: Double Cow and Toronto Zero Waste blog, Find Your Alternative, is pairing up to clean our parks. Starting July 25th with Trinity Bellwoods.

Starting at 6:30PM, we’re going hands-in to collect litter. Join us to make your contribution to the community. See you there!