Overcluttered

So much has evolved and transformed throughout the years with technology, social media, and the way we work, but in the centre of it all we’re still very much the same. We’re still people, and we still need our basic necessities: water, food, shelter, safety, and security. Our minds can only handle and process a few pieces of information at once yet we are bombarded by thousands of pieces of marketing content per day.

Take it slow, and appreciate what you already have around you.

To the ones with young minds at heart

Hey you there,

The one with the books in your hand with a thousand fresh ideas, wondering how you’re going to help change the world.

You’re somebody who wants to constantly learn and grow yourself and the people around you. You have heart and care about the world in a peculiar way.

We could do more if we had people like you everywhere.

Let’s face it. We need people to solve people problems. And if you care, that gives you a huge advantage.

It’s a big place, but there’s lots more people out there willing to join and help.

Will you start something today?

Cue wise old auntie

It begins when we change what we think, but things truly start when we act on the things that we think. Here comes the age-old saying, our actions speak louder than words.

Intentions matter for only so long. When we intend to create better transportation infrastructure for a city, to make traffic more efficient, safer, and on time, delays and cancellations communicate that we never intended to do any of it in the first place.

That’s why when Magali Lafleur from Find Your Alternative and I wanted to make an environmental difference in Toronto, we’re going hands-in-dirt into cleaning up our city’s parks with our community.

Two everyday citizens wanting better, where we can make an immediate difference.

If you want to join us, the event is today. We’re meeting up at 6:30 by Trinity Bellwoods Park by Queen St. and Strachan Ave. We’ll see you there!

Think, say, do

Everything counts (who’s counting?)

The details matter (says who?)

We can do it if we try (do you really think so?)

The fact of the matter is, nothing counts only if you think it doesn’t; the details are worthless if you think the attention should be focused on elsewhere; and if you won’t be someone who tries, who will?

What we think should match up to what we say, and what we say should reflect what we do.

Trying your best!

Trying your best to go zero waste but forgot your reusable bags at home when you took a trip to the supermarket?

Did the barista at your local cafe stick a plastic straw into your drink even though you brought your reusable cup?

It’s okay, we’ve all been there. Making these mistakes every once in a while is forgivable. If you believe it’s worth it, keep trying.

The high-intensity-nonstop-burn-and-drop diet

Burnout is unsustainable. Imagine being sucked out of your energy day-in-day-out, with nothing to help feed into your wellbeing. No music, no exercise, no free socialization.

Another version that might not be as abstract is this:

Imagine going week to week eating nothing but highly refined, sugary foods. This is a diet that feeds our bodies nothing of nutritive value.

It’s not pretty nor good for us, but burnout happens when we repeatedly do things with no progressive outcome.

Spare your wellbeing from it, and instead create meaning into your actions.

Massive incremental change

Our current mandate in sustainability is about change—massive, incremental change. It’s not something we can accomplish by sitting behind a computer screen. Rather, it’s something that happens step by step in the physical world.

We can try to change the world behind our screens, but the digital world is so full of loud and flashy noise, it’ll take us ages to swim through the clutter.

What are you doing to create incremental change in your life?

To find better

Why is it that were bought into thinking that we can’t take action to protect our environment, our health and wellbeing?

Maybe our urban cities have been so far removed from a non-wasteful lifestyle that it seems almost impossible to step away from a fast paced culture. That is, we’re speeding on the highway and there’s no sense in hitting the brakes when there’s nobody up ahead.

There’s no help in following everyone else when it doesn’t make sense for you.

On the other hand, there are just over a million things that can help us be more conscious of taking better care of ourselves, our health, and our futures. It just takes a deeper look to find, but there is the alternative.

The alternative is out there, and it’s better, more sustainable, and necessary for all of us.

Trinity park cleanup

What can a small community do to take action when climate change and government policy is slow to progress?

We can choose to do things that don’t require permission, and something that we can realistically achieve in our own incremental steps.

With that said, Magali Lafleur (blogger from Find Your Alternative) is partnering up with Double Cow to host our own community clean-up at Trinity Bellwoods Park.

It starts with a pickup, and you can tell us you’ll come by responding to our event page here.

Thursday, July 25th at 6:30PM.

Litter is everybody’s problem and this is our chance to make our contribution. See you there.

Design thinkers and current clout

“Design thinking is fluffy” coming from two guys discussing business in a high end co-working office.

I must admit that it generates a lot of excitement and buzz when we use the term design thinking. When asked for it, many who have included it onto their résumé might not explicitly know what design thinking covers.

To clarify, design thinking is a process that is similar to the scientific method. Here’s a broad their of its progressive steps:

  1. Empathize
  2. Define
  3. Ideate
  4. Prototype
  5. Test
  6. Iterate/Implement

Academics in the science community who follow the scientific method don’t qualify themselves as scientific thinkers. It is rather a given that they follow the scientific method as part of their protocol. On the other hand, Design thinking becomes fluffy if the people using the term don’t have an understanding of what it is, and why we have it.

Design thinking is a great thing, and I love everything about the process if it means getting to understand and solve different human problems that contribute to our culture and humanity.